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Thursday, March 5, 2009

Something's cookin' .....

Time with the grandchildren isn't all I can do now that I'm not working .... I have time to cook again!!

Tall & Handsome and I really, really miss English food so I've done my best to learn a few of his favorite (or should that be favourite???) dishes ~ like Cottage Pie*.

Cottage Pie* made with Colman's pie mix is the easiest and tastiest English meat pie you will ever eat. I also happen to think it's the most authentic.

E-Z-P-Z: Brown 1# of ground mince (beef) with some chopped onion; drain; add Colman's [Cottage Pie] flavor packet and water; bring to boil. Pour mixture into baking dish and top with homemade mashed potatoes. Bake 30 minutes. Serve with Heinz baked beans. Drizzle thick, dark gravy made with Bisto over pie. Don't forget a bracing cup of tea to wash it all down!

(We prefer our Cottage Pie with beans, and any leftover pie with peas.)

*Cottage Pie is made with beef; Shepherd's Pie is made with lamb. Check your local British Food shop for Bisto; Heinz beans; and Colman's mixes.

10 comments:

parTea lady said...

I've never tried this made with Colman's mix. I make a version of Sheperd's Pie with beef, so maybe I should be calling it Cottage Pie. Anyway, I love this kind of hearty, flavorful food.

My favorite English dish was my Aunt Ina's steak and kidney pie with chips that she made when I visited her in Newcastle Under Lyme. I also really like PG Tips tea.

Janeen said...

Ooh that looks yummy! Thanks for posting your recipe, I'm on a quest now for the goodies!

Question for you, I tried the tea pictured in your post and something was really different about it but I couldn't put my finger on it until I read a comment recently that said it had a malty flavor. Eureka~ that's what I was thinking but couldn't describe. Do you happen to know what makes it malty in flavor?

Bernideen's Tea Time Blog said...

Denise: I have seen this mix in one of the catalogs where we order English clotted cream etc for the store. Maybe I should try some!

Southern Touch Catering said...

Denise, I love this blog. Being a caterer I have been asked to do menus that I've have never cooked before. Twice within a few months I had to cook for 2 different families who originated from England. I looked up the family names and did a memos for them & then looked up British foods. The menus were Fish N Chips (fried fish & potatoes), Bangers & Mashed (sausages & mashed potatoes), Welsh Rarebit, Yorkshire Pudding & gravy and Cottage Pie! I had such fun learning the recipes. But I was so nervious because I had NO IDEA what they were suppose to taste like. Fortunately I got a lot of great compliments!

Angela McRae said...

Next time I'm in north Atlanta, I'm headed to the British food shop there to find these things. Great post!

CorvaCXVI said...

Denise, great picture and thanks for the recipe. Love the Brown Betty sitting there!

Janeen, the malty flavor in the PG Tips comes from the type of tea they use. It's a characteristic of Assam tea from India. Assams are my very favorite tea, especially for mornings. Harney & Sons sells a wonderful Irish Breakfast Tea made with Assam tea. I have also had Assam blended with Darjeeling that's very good.

Melissa said...

All I can say is yuuummmy!

Good job pointing out the differences between Shepherd's and Cottage pie. There tends to be a some confusion about that in the US.

Rebecca said...

Hello there Denise...This cottage pie looks delicious. I've never tried Colman's mix either but will look for it at the Celtic store nearby; they carry items like this...

What a lovely blog...

Denise at Uniquely Tea said...

Thanks everyone for your comments and I'm thrilled to read that some of you will be trying this yourself...and that others are already bonafide cooks of English food! I'd like to suggest that once you have made a Cottage Pie, that you try a Shepherd's Pie as well. Here in America we don't eat nearly as much lamb as they do in the UK and it would be something different for you and your family and/or clients. I get my lamb at the local Publix supermarket and just ask the butcher to grind it into mince (ground lamb, like ground beef). Be sure to use the Colman's Shepherd's Pie mix with this one as the spices are different than for Cottage Pie. Good luck everyone and let us know how it went!!! P.S. And a friendly Welcome to Rebecca!

Sharon said...

Love this! My Scottish mother-in-law makes a similar Shepard's Pie. Hooray for the PG Tips in your photo - love that too! Thanks to "Nana" (what all our boys call my mother-in-law) this American Southern girl has learned to love lots of things from the UK. Guess that's one reason I enjoy your blog so much. Hugs, Sharon

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